The Toys We Can’t Use

toys on top shelfMiss Barrier was my elementary school music teacher.  I think she liked me—she always gave me passes and excuses when my total lack of musical ability embarrassed me.

Miss Barrier and her sister also did some child care at their home on weekends.  Occasionally when my parents needed to be gone for a Saturday, they left my sisters and me at their home for the day.  It was not my favorite place.

The Barrier sisters were strict, but not mean.  However one reality there totally confused and frustrated me.  We spent most of our time in one room.  There were toys and activities—we had things to do. But all around the top of the toy/bookshelves were some amazing toys and dolls, musical instruments and art supplies.

Apparently these were just for show.  They never came down from the top shelf—we were never allowed to use them.  That seemed so wrong to me, and it still does.

Why would you line a children’s playroom with enticing toys they couldn’t use?

I find similar feelings when I see God’s daughters who have been gifted by God with remarkable abilities and talents and spiritual gifts—and they aren’t allowed to use them.

That goes against what I know about God.

God was there, making each of his children.  He put in every one what they would need to do the good works He had prepared for them to do in their lifetime.

The Spirit gives spiritual gifts to every child of God—equipping them to do their assignment in building up the Body of Christ.

Jesus sends every son and daughter out to make disciples all over the world, teaching them to obey all that He taught.  He promised to go with each one of us, enabling us to do what He has sent us to do.

Jesus tells us that, on the last day, He will ask all His childen what they did with what He gave them.  Were they good stewards of all the talents—time, treasure, finances, gifts, abilities—that He entrusted to them?  Did they do their part in building God’s Kingdom?

Perhaps the real question is:  Were they allowed to?  Or encouraged to?

Leaders have a stewardship requirement for those they lead, or shepherd. My husband takes seriously his stewardship for the ministry he leads.  He wants, when the Lord asks him what he did with all that was entrusted to him, to be able to give a good report.  He desires to ensure that he was a good steward of the finances, plans and strategies, values, training, tools and resources of our organization.

That includes the human resources—half of which are female.

The Father designs each daughter for good works.  The Spirit gives each one the needed gifts.  Jesus sends them out to build the Kingdom.

He has taken His gifts down from the top shelf and given them to His children–sons and daughters–to use to take the good news to the world.

I can’t wait to see how the Kingdom expands when every one is becoming all that God created them to be and doing all that God has prepared for them to do.




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Posted on by JudyDouglass in Becoming Kindling, True Followers 4 Comments

About the author

JudyDouglass

Writer, speaker, director of Women's Resources at CCC. Journalism graduate of University of Texas

4 Responses to The Toys We Can’t Use

  1. Annie Barnett

    I cannot tell you how much I appreciate your perspective and encouragement in this, Judy. I’m wrestling with this right now – wanting to be a good steward and lean into those gifts, invite others along for the journey. Thank you.

     
    • JudyDouglass

      May God give you courage, wisdom and grace to follow His lead in this.

       
  2. Anne Schweitzer

    Thank you so much for this great encouragement.
    Be blessed!

     

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