The Homeless Veteran: Guest Post by Bobby Hegedish

Engaging with homeless people I encounter has become a joy and a passion for me.  My friend Bobby Hegedish has discovered a similar calling. I think you will love his story of a homeless veteran. Orlando (although a city like Cleveland where I call home) has a much different vibe than most of the cities I have been to. Ethnic, cultural and economical diversity paint the town colors that make it known as “The City Beautiful.” I don’t usually find myself walking the streets of downtown Orlando past 11:00 PM. However, walking the streets recently to where my parked car was located gave me a sense of being small. Surrounded by skyscrapers and people, from wanderers to third-shift workers, I had a sense of being invisible. But in a moment of discrete observation and contemplation, the city around me became like a scene from a good documentary. What happened next would have made a great scene in such a film. Muttered words I could barely understand came from a man passing by on my right, head to the ground and papers in hand. From when I was a child, I have had a particular burden for those who had less and the homeless. Regardless of how they got there, it was their reality. Yet in small suburban Cleveland growing up, there weren’t many people with those situations to interact with. “Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.” (Matthew 25:40) Stopping in my tracks, I turned to the man in a split-second decision to attempt a conversation with him. I’ve tried many ways of serving the poor throughout the past several years: giving money or food, taking them out to eat, giving rides, and even a place to stay. These have been exercises as well as tests of faith for me. However, it is so easy to dismiss and project critical, judgmental thoughts onto folks like this man, who I found out was named David. These initial heart-level responses are inherent: external circumstances which trigger pre-disposed responses. Call it “flight Read more

Write the Vision: Guest Post by Stacey Thacker

  “And the Lord answered me: ‘Write the vision; make it plain on tablets, so he may run who reads it.’” (Habakkuk 2:2) A couple of years ago I found a kindred heart on the pages of God’s Word. His name was Habakkuk. He has a tiny three-chapter book in the Old Testament with his name on it. Maybe I liked him immediately because he wrestled with God. Or perhaps it was because of something God told Habakkuk to do, even though he was feeling fresh out of amazing like me. “What did God tell Habakkuk to do? He told the prophet to pick up the chisel and write the vision on a tablet. God also told him how to do it. The phrase “keep it simple.” Now consider that God had to tell farmer-turned-prophet Habakkuk to keep his message simple. He didn’t have a hashtag, images purchased from iStock, or even colored pens to make his message extra special. He didn’t have a Journaling Bible or a You-Tube video. He had a simple message written on tablets of stone, and God said, “Hey, Habakkuk, just write what you saw. Nothing less. Nothing more.” When God speaks we don’t need to dress it up or make it fancy. His Word, his vision, his instructions are enough. God told Habakkuk to write it down. And he did. I know what you may be thinking: “But I’m not a writer. I failed writing in college. I avoid writing grocery lists. This doesn’t apply to me.” Before you move on, though, let me just put this out there for you to consider: Habakkuk was a farmer. Peter was a fisherman. David was a shepherd. Matthew was a tax collector. James was a carpenter. I am a mom. Write the vision on people's hearts. You don’t have to identify as a writer to write down faith-affirming words inspired by God. You simply have to be willing. And whether anyone sees your words or you tuck them away in a journal like I did for years, your words matter because your soul matters. Writing is indeed clarifying soul work. And isn’t that what we need Read more

Our Loving Bitmojis--Just in Time for Valentine's

We would know we love each other if we never said the words because of the little things we do daily to demonstrate Read more

Lingering in the Word of God Brings Transformation

This is the third post from my word for the year—linger. What does a true follower of Jesus look like and live like? I ask that question often, especially as I read—and linger--in the Word God. Today I was in Romans 12—which is abounding with words that unveil the beautiful, character-growing transformation that God has promised to do in our lives. A Living Sacrifice The chapter is brimming with instructions to encourage us to surrender to God’s labor of love in our lives. So we will take a brief look at just verses 1-2, and hopefully continue through the chapter in later posts. And so, dear brothers and sisters, I plead with you to give your bodies to God because of all he has done for you. Let them be a living and holy sacrifice—the kind he will find acceptable. This is truly the way to worship him. Don’t copy the behavior and customs of this world, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think. Then you will learn to know God’s will for you, which is good and pleasing and perfect. (Romans 12:1-2, NLT) Paul is addressing you and me as well as the believers in Rome: brothers and sisters—all of us! What he wants to say to us is so vital and essential that he pleads with us. Because of all God has done for us, he reasons, we must give our bodies to God. This giving of ourselves is no small matter—we are to give ourselves as a living and holy sacrifice. A living sacrifice? Clearly something different than the sacrifices of animals. What does it mean to be a living sacrifice? (Here’s a hint: We will find out what that looks like as we encounter the verses that follow in the rest of the chapter.) And a holy sacrifice? Me? You? Holy? Only because we have been made holy by the sacrifice of Jesus. And acceptable to God? Again, only because we have been bought by Jesus’ death on the cross. How does our Father receive our very personal sacrifices? As worship. Perhaps this giving of our living selves is Read more

Hidden Figures - the work and worth of women at Tim Fall

  For years I have been an advocate for the staff women in our ministry, seeking greater opportunities for them to use their gifts. In more recent years my friend and acquaintance circle has expanded to embrace many women of color. So it's no surprise that I loved Hidden Figures. It is a beautiful story of overcoming prejudice and discrimination to accomplish great things.  And I am grateful that Tim Fall invited me to write a personal reflection on the movie. I hope this "review" will get you up and on your way to see it.. Here's a taste, then head on over to Tim's blog, Just One Train Wreck After Another, to keep reading.   My stomach knotted. Already? Would there be trouble even in the opening scene? Three young black women on their way to work at NASA in the early 1960s stalled on the side of a country road. As the “mechanical one” worked to fix the problem, a police officer pulled up behind them. Cheerfulness turned to confrontation. My whole body tensed as I remembered such encounters in books I had read, in movies I had seen, in stories my friends had related. Gratefully “working at NASA” rescued them and the officer escorted them to their jobs. I attended the showing of Hidden Figures with the global leaders of Cru. It’s become tradition at the annual Executive Team retreat to take a break and attend a current significant movie. I asked why Hidden Figures was chosen, though there were other important films available in the same theater.... Keep reading: https://timfall.wordpress.com/2017/01/23/hidden-figures-the-work-and-worth-of-women/ What about you?  What emotions did this stir? c2017 Judy Read more

Guest posts

Write the Vision: Guest Post by Stacey Thacker

Write the Vision

 

“And the Lord answered me: ‘Write the vision; make it plain on tablets, so he may run who reads it.’” (Habakkuk 2:2)

A couple of years ago I found a kindred heart on the pages of God’s Word. His name was Habakkuk. He has a tiny three-chapter book in the Old Testament with his name on it. Maybe I liked him immediately because he wrestled with God. Or perhaps it was because of something God told Habakkuk to do, even though he was feeling fresh out of amazing like me.

“What did God tell Habakkuk to do? He told the prophet to pick up the chisel and write the vision on a tablet. God also told him how to do it. The phrase “keep it simple.”

Now consider that God had to tell farmer-turned-prophet Habakkuk to keep his message simple. He didn’t have a hashtag, images purchased from iStock, or even colored pens to make his message extra special. He didn’t have a Journaling Bible or a You-Tube video.

He had a simple message written on tablets of stone, and God said, “Hey, Habakkuk, just write what you saw. Nothing less. Nothing more.” When God speaks we don’t need to dress it up or make it fancy. His Word, his vision, his instructions are enough.

God told Habakkuk to write it down. And he did.

I know what you may be thinking: “But I’m not a writer. I failed writing in college. I avoid writing grocery lists. This doesn’t apply to me.” Before you move on, though, let me just put this out there for you to consider:

  • Habakkuk was a farmer.
  • Peter was a fisherman.
  • David was a shepherd.
  • Matthew was a tax collector.
  • James was a carpenter.
  • I am a mom.

Write the vision on people’s hearts.

You don’t have to identify as a writer to write down faith-affirming words inspired by God.

You simply have to be willing. And whether anyone sees your words or you tuck them away in a journal like I did for years, your words matter because your soul matters. Writing is indeed clarifying soul work. And isn’t that what we need most when we are fresh out of amazing?

Maybe you think this is fine for word-loving girls, but you still do not consider yourself a writer. Perhaps even keeping a private journal has no appeal to you. I have had times in my life when my journal sits unused and gathers dust. I get the “no appeal.” I really do. But guess what? Friend, we are the actual living letters other people are reading.

The apostle Paul said it in 2 Corinthians 3:2-3 (The Voice):

You are our letter, every word burned onto our hearts to be read by everyone. You are the living letter of the Anointed One, the Liberating King, nurtured by us and inscribed, not with ink, but with the Spirit of the living God—a letter too passionate to be chiseled onto stone tablets, but emblazoned upon the human heart.

We open our heart and from the beginning God begins to mark it with his holy pen. He writes Christ on it, telling those who read our lives that we are his. God doesn’t write on stone tablets anymore. He writes on human hearts that live and breathe and have their being in him.

And as we go about our day, our hearts bump into the hearts of others, and we write a message on their hearts as well. When we write God’s grace words, we build up, love, and encourage the people we encounter.

It gives me pause to think of the hearts I have written on today. What mark did I leave? Have I left a God word there for others to read? Will my marks on their hearts point others to Him? The most powerful place to write God’s truth is on the tablet of someone’s heart. We have to treat this responsibility with great care.

As a writer, I often think about the effect of words.

But I hope after considering it, you understand that you are a writer too. It is tempting when we are fresh out of amazing to only write messages of discouragement and discontent on the hearts of others. But sharing the gospel is simply writing Jesus on the heart of everyone we encounter. When we do that, people will not say, “She is amazing!” They will say, “Wow! Her God is good.”

Your words, if chosen carefully, can land in the soft places of people’s hearts and point them to Jesus. I’m overwhelmed by this opportunity he so freely gives.

It is truly sacred space. “

(Adapted from Fresh Out of Amazing: Opening Your Heart to God’s Unexpected Invitation)

Stacey_716-0Stacey Thacker is a wife and the mother of four girls. Creator of the popular blog Mothers of Daughters, she is a writer and speaker who loves God’s Word. Her passion is to connect with women and encourage them in their walks with God. Her books include Hope for the Weary Mom, the Hope for the Weary Mom Devotional: A 40 Day Journey (co-written with Brooke McGlothlin) and Fresh Out of Amazing. You can find her blogging at staceythacker.com and hanging out on Instagram and Twitter @staceythacker, usually with a cup of coffee in her hand.

 

 




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12 Days of Random Acts of Christmas Kindness

At Ronald McDonald House

Kindness and compassion are usually the motivations behind RAKs—Random Acts of Kindness.

The phrase caught hold through a book—Random Acts of Kindness—by Anne Herbert, telling true stories of acts of kindness. Defined as unpremeditated, inconsistent actions designed to offer kindness toward the outside world, RAK’s have become popular practices in our world today, counteracting, according to author Herbert, “random acts of violence and senseless acts of cruelty.”

Kindness and compassion began long before—in the beginning as we humans were first created by a kind and compassionate God. To be kind and compassionate was hardwired in us, though most of us have strayed from that approach to life in varying degrees.

The Apostle Paul emphasized the importance for children of God to live and love as Jesus did—putting on compassion and kindness (Colossians 3:12). Random Acts of Kindness should be a way of life for us.

Make snacks for RMH

My friend Heather has, for several years, sought to make this lifestyle real to her daughters, now 6 and 4. Every Christmas they have embarked on 12 Days of Random Acts of Christmas Kindness. The kind acts change as the children grow.

“We do 12 days…other people do more or less…whatever makes sense for their family and budget.” Heather explains. “Here’s what we are doing this year for RACK.”
Day 1–Buy Coffee for someone
Day 2–Buy Groceries for someone
Day 3–Deliver treats to neighbors
Day 4–Make snack packs for Ronald McDonald House (with help from friends)
Day 5–Deliver snack packs to Ronald McDonald House
Day 6–Take thank you cards and treats to firefighters
Day 7–Give out candy canes to shoppers
Day 8–Give to Salvation Army Red Kettle—and ring the bell
Day 9–Take gifts to a family in need
Day 10–Prepare dinner for our church family
Day 11–Provide Redbox movies and snacks (leave $1, popcorn and candy taped to Redbox machines…we usually leave 2 at each)
Day 12–Give Starbucks gift cards to strangers or service workers

Movie and a snack
Other ideas we’ve done in the past:
– Give to Angel Tree
– Give treats for trash and delivery men
– Give Lotto tickets at gas pumps
– Buy dinner for someone
– Collect cans for food drive
– Serve meals to the poor
– Give treats for teachers
– Make ornaments for friends
– Send cards to soldiers
– Take toys to kids at the hospital
– Give to Toys for Tots
– Go caroling and hand out candy canes for neighbors
– Prepare a shoebox for Operation Christmas Child

giving to Red Kettle

Wow! A beautiful practice, and great training for a lifetime of kindness and compassion.

Your 12 Days of Random Acts of Christmas Kindness can begin today—after all the original 12 Days of Christmas began with Christmas Day and ended with Epiphany on January 6. The season of Advent, beginning on the fourth Sunday before Christmas, is a month for Christians to await the coming of Christ in a spirit of expectation, singing hymns of longing. Then, on December 25, Christmas Day itself ushers in 12 days of celebration. RACK would be a great way to celebrate.

But why limit your kindness and compassion to Christmas? We can celebrate and honor—and emulate—Christ every day as we look for ways to live and love as He did as a way of life.

What about you? What RACK’s might you do?

C2016 Judy Douglass

Related posts:

What to Wear as a Child of God: Kindness

What to Wear as a Child of God: Compassion 

 

 

 

 




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Cru Inner City: A Heart for the Poor by John Sather

This past weekend I had the privilege of participating in a Christmas in New York gathering for friends of Cru Inner City.  We saw some of the realities of life in the inner city and heard stories of help and hope. I was especially moved by this message from John Sather, co-national director of this ministry to the poor and marginalized.  This truly expresses the heart of God. You will want to watch the Brennan Manning video at the end–I believe this helps us grasp the heart of Christmas.

Friends at the Cru Inner City warehouse

Packing homeless care kits: blanket, hats, gloves, scarfs, toiletries, health protein bars, booklet that tells all the social services they can go to for help.

  • Matthew 5:3 – “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.”
  • Matthew 25:40 – “And the King will answer them, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.’
  • Jeremiah 22: 16 – “He judged the cause of the poor and needy; then it was well. Is not this to know me? declares the Lord.”
  • Isaiah 61:1 –The Spirit of the Sovereign Lord is on me, because the Lord has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim freedom for the captives and release from darkness for the prisoners…”
  • Psalm 35:10 – “All my bones shall say,“O Lord, who is like you, delivering the poor from him who is too strong for him, the poor and needy from him who robs him?”

“Passionate Concern”

Isaiah 58:1-12

Pastor John Piper states, “The point of Isaiah 58 is this: Piety that does not produce a passion for God-exalting social justice and practical mercy is worthless. Or to put it positively: God promises that we will break forth like the dawn if our piety produces a passion for social justice and practical mercy.”

The core of our belief must be the gospel and especially when it comes to doing biblical justice ministry: Pastor Tim Keller states so well: “The Christian gospel is that I am so flawed that Jesus had to die for me, yet I am so loved and valued that Jesus was glad to die for me. This leads to deep humility and deep confidence at the same time. It undermines both swaggering and sniveling. I cannot feel superior to anyone, and yet I have nothing to prove to anyone. I do not think more of myself or less of myself. Instead, I think of myself less.”

Prayer before packing

Read Isaiah 58:1-12. In these passages there are five basic human needs that God is passionately concerned about for every person. These reflect the mission, vision and values of Cru® Inner City:

1.The need for freedom from bondage and oppression.

Four times in verse 6 and once in verse 9 the writer comments on this. Verse 6: “Loose the bonds of wickedness, undo the straps of the yoke, let the oppressed go free, break every yoke.” Verse 9b: “Take away the yoke from your midst.”

How can the inner workings of the heart be changed from a dynamic of fear and anger and control to that of love, joy, freedom and gratitude? Here is how. We need to be moved by the sight of what it cost to bring us home. The key difference between a Pharisee and a believer in Jesus is inner-heart motivation. Pharisees are being good but out of a fear-fueled need to control God. They don’t really trust him or love him. To them God is an exacting boss, not a loving father. Christians, on the other hand, have seen something that has transformed their hearts toward God so they can finally love and rest in the Father.”— Pastor Timothy Keller, The Prodigal God

2. The need for food.

Verse 7a: “Is it not to share your bread with the hungry?”

3. The need for housing.

Verse 7b: “[Is it not] to bring the homeless poor into your house?”

4. The need for clothing.

Verse 7c: “[Is not this the fast I choose:] When you see the naked, to cover him?

5. The need for respect.

Verse 9b: “Take away . . . the pointing of the finger, and speaking wickedness.” In other words, stop accusing unjustly and belittling and exploiting.

The God of the Bible (found in Christ alone) is present with the poor, the hungry, the broken, the disabled, the mentally ill, the aging, the marginalized and the powerless.

When our focus is on being in control, obsessed with success, having influence at any cost, grabbing for power and angry when things don’t go our way, do we really know God? When we know Him, have been transformed by His grace, we naturally move towards those who are truly like ourselves: those experiencing brokenness, loneliness and struggling with human need. Pastor John Piper said “I love it when the church moves towards needs not comfort.”

For us to carry out God’s Great Command to love our neighbor, we need to stay close to those who are small, vulnerable and weak, caring about their needs.

folding blankets

 

making new friends

Isaiah preaches biblical justice to the people of God simply and profoundly, so our piety, our love for God should produce a passion for biblical justice and practical mercy…because we WANT TO not have to...

  • When we discover His grace and mercy, at the foot of the Cross, we can truly rejoice and experience the love of Jesus because we will want that for others too!
  • Tim Keller says “…when justice for the poor is connected not to guilt but to grace and to the gospel, this “pushes the button” down deep in believers’ souls, and they begin to wake up–” Generous Justice: How God’s Grace Makes Us Just

All the rest of this text of Isaiah is a promise about the good things that happen in our lives when we give ourselves away to others in the cause of justice and mercy. And we know from the fulfillment of this prophecy (in Jesus) that this does not mean we earn God’s blessings. God himself, through Christ, purchases them for us at the cross and empowers us to fulfill the conditions for them.

Verse 8: “If you give yourself away to bring justice and mercy in the world, instead of just living for your own comforts….

“…Then shall your light break forth like the dawn, and your healing shall spring up speedily; your righteousness shall go before you; the glory of the Lord shall be your rear guard. 9 Then you shall call, and the Lord will answer; you shall cry, and he will say, ‘Here I am.’.” [He continues in the middle of verse 10:] “then shall your light rise in the darkness and your gloom be as the noonday. 11 And the Lord will guide you continually and satisfy your desire in scorched places and make your bones strong; and you shall be like a watered garden, like a spring of water, whose waters do not fail. 12 And your ancient ruins shall be rebuilt; you shall raise up the foundations of many generations; you shall be called the repairer of the breach, the restorer of streets to dwell in.”

Brennan Manning has produced a powerful short video on Compassion 

What about you? How is God growing your heart of compassion?

john-satherJohn Sather is the co-national director of Cru Inner City, seeking comprehensive Biblical Justice thru the local church. He and his wife, Chris, live in Minneapolis/St. Paul. You can find him on Facebook  and Twitter.




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What to Wear as a Child of God: Love

Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience.  Bear with each other and forgive one another if any of you has a grievance against someone. Forgive as the Lord forgave you. And over all these virtues put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity. (Colossians 3:12-14)

 Japanese wedding cup-love

Last week Steve and I had the privilege of meeting in our semiannual gathering with the leaders of five other ministries to students. We talked at length about the divisive issues that face us today as we share the gospel.

One of the women asked me what I thought would be the key to breaking through to the hearts and minds of students. My answer: Love. “What will that look like?” she asked.

I think it is the life of Jesus lived out tangibly. We do what he did at the beginning of His ministry: “Jesus went into Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God. ‘The time has come,’ he said. ‘The kingdom of God has come near. Repent and believe the good news!” (Mark 1:14-15)

We also take to heart Jesus’ words announcing His ministry: “The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to set the oppressed free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.”f (Luke 4:18-19 from Isaiah 61:1-3)

Jesus didn’t separate His ministry into proclamation gospel and social action gospel. He preached the Kingdom of God, he healed the sick. He called people to repent, He fed the hungry. He challenged people to “sin no more” and He offered mercy and grace. He called his disciples to holiness and He touched lepers. It was all love in action.

He went even further: Love God, He said, and others as yourself. Love as I have loved–laying down my life for you. (Luke 10:27; John 13:34-35)

Paul affirms the same emphasis. He has encouraged us to put on the clothing of Jesus: compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, patience, forgiveness. And then he adds: And over all these virtues put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity.

When Steve and I got married we were given a traditional Japanese wedding cup, like the one pictured above. Inscribed on it were the words from our verse above: Love binds them together in perfect unity.

Our friend who gave it to us explained that the concept of binding together was explained by the Japanese “obi.” The obi is the sash that holds a kimono together. The wedding blessing on the cup was that love would hold together all that we had committed to each other.

In the same way, Paul indicates that love is the “obi” that binds together all that Christ has called and empowered us to be. Are we naturally full of compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, patience, forgiveness? Not so much. But love motivates us, equips us, empowers us and moves us to action.

Love is the final and essential piece in the beautiful wardrobe Jesus always wore and has bequeathed to us. As we put on love—the life-sacrificing kind of love Jesus lived—we will find ourselves increasingly clothed in compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, patience, forgiveness.

This exquisite apparel will captivate the hearts and minds of those to whom we proclaim the gospel of Christ’s love, mercy and grace. And of course will be perfectly befitting of our Savior’s Bride.

What about you? How are you living out the love of Christ?

 C2016 Judy Douglass

Related post; What to Wear as a Child of God: Forgiveness




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What to Wear as a Child of God: Forgiveness

Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience… and forgive one another….” (Colossians 3:12-13)

forgiveness sets people free

It was a little thing. My friend forgot we had a brunch appointment. “Please forgive me, Judy.” Of course, I forgave her.

After all, I had done the same to a friend just weeks before—I totally forgot we were having breakfast together. And she forgave me.

Forgiveness is not so easy, though, when the offense is bigger, more hurtful, even devastating.

How do you say “I forgive you” to the scammer who stole your identity

To the man who raped your daughter?

Or, like our adopted son, to the dad who never showed up and the mother who consistently chose her addictions?

And how do you ask forgiveness from a friend you have hurt, from a stranger you have harmed with your carelessness, for unkind words yelled at a child?

God is clear: We must forgive. And we must ask for forgiveness.

Forgiveness is an essential garment in our wardrobe as a child of God.

Surely Peter thought he was being magnanimous in suggesting he would forgive someone seven times. But Jesus responded, “I tell you, not seven times, but seventy-seven times. (Matthew 18:22)

Jesus is our example.

It’s not hard for me to be overwhelmed with wonder and gratitude: Jesus has forgiven me. All my sin—my many sins—he took on himself. Because he loves me.

And as he hung on that cross, he looked out over the crowd, the scoffers, his executioners, and said these amazing words: “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.” (Luke 23:34)

I could argue that they did, indeed, know what they were doing. It was quite intentional. I can easily forgive the mistakes, the forgetfulness, the unintentional hurts. But when someone chooses to hurt or to harm or to speak maliciously or to steal or lie or abuse…

Forgive.

Jesus tells us how: “…if any of you has a grievance against someone, forgive as the Lord forgave you.” (Colossians 3:13)

As the Lord forgave–willingly, in love and mercy, in the Spirit.

As in all the impossible requests and requirements Jesus has given us, he does it first and then enables us by the power of his Spirit living in us.

And I have found when I forgive, or ask forgiveness, at least two people are set free—the one forgiven and the one who forgives.

What about you? Is there someone you need to forgive?

C2016 Judy Douglass

Related posts:

What to Wear as a Child of God: Patience

What to Wear as a Child of God: Humility




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